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Make your own version of these crazily popular candy

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Rosé gummy bears are the most decadent and adorable homemade candy.

Yes, perhaps unsurprisingly, rosé gummy bears are this year’s latest food craze. These little candies are so popular that they are almost constantly sold out, and we can’t wait any longer to eat a bagful of these sugary, alcoholic treats. Here’s how to go about it.

Heat one cup of rosé wine (it doesn’t have to be super fancy, just whichever bottle you’d normally buy) in a small saucepan set over a low heat. Gradually add one and a half ounces of powdered gelatin, a tablespoon at a time, stirring between each addition, until it has completely dissolved. Add in half a cup of granulated sugar and continue to stir and heat gently until dissolved. Finally, pour the jelly into gummy bear molds, and place in the refrigerator to set for at least two hours.

You need to keep these preservative-free homemade gummy bears sealed in the refrigerator. They’ll last for several days.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.


Skip The Waitlist And Make Your Own Rosé Gummy Bears

There's a very good reason Sugarfina sold out of its inventory&mdashand has a 1,000-person-and-growing waitlist for its rosé gummies: Those peachy-pink bursts of summer aren't easy to replicate. But, when you get them right, they're a divine mashup of chewy candy and the fruity-floral booze.

There are a few ways to go about making these gummies, but through plenty of trial and error (emphasis on the error), this version tasted the best. It involves buying unflavored gelatin, which&mdashI know&mdashseems freaky and makes you think you'll surely mess it up, but that couldn't be farther from the truth. If you've made regular Jell-O before, you can conquer plain, unflavored gelatin. Deep breaths.

Basically, you're just heating up rosé, and whisking in sugar until it's dissolved. Once the wine-sugar mixture starts to bubble, turn off the heat and gradually sprinkle in each packet of gelatin, whisking it to avoid any clumps. Really. That's it.

If you see clumps, break them up, and whisk them all away.

One tiny drop of pink food coloring is all you need to turn this candy bright pink. You don't really need it, but we found the gummies are more of a murky brownish-pink otherwise, thanks to all of that cloudy gelatin. (Not cool, gelatin. Not cool.)

Pour them into silicone molds&mdashwe used tiny ice cube and candy melts molds, purchased in the cake and chocolate-making section of a crafts store&mdashand refrigerate them until set.

One word of caution: Homemade gummy bears aren't as solid and chewy as the store-bought kind. They're actually closer to Jell-O Jigglers, so prepare yourself for that texture. The flavor, though, is a lightly sweetened rosé.

You could skip sugar altogether, but in our tests, we found it needed the sweetness to boost its flavor. Otherwise, it tastes a lot like jiggly, dry water. Meh. On that note, you could also soak regular gummy bears in rosé, classic drunken-bear style, but the original gummy bear's flavor typically overpowers the candy, so you don't really taste rosé&mdashand the gummies get kind of slimy.

This version, however, can tide you over until the wait(list) is over. Or make you consider opening your own competing biz. Rosé Gummé has a nice ring to it, you know.



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