The Story Behind Rod’s Diner



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If you’re anything like me, you’ve always had a striking need to know why Rod’s Diner serves both fro-yo and Korean food. The combination seems random to say the least, so I went on a mission to discover the back-story.

Photo by Julie Mirliss

This Ann Arbor staple has been around since 1988 when original owner Rod opened shop. As I entered, I was greeted by current owner Park who works 7 days a week from open to close, preparing and cooking all of the food himself.

Park explained that “the girls love my colliders” (let’s be honest, we do), but that in the winter, fro-yo can’t support this one-man show. So, when he took over shop in 2006 as the fourth owner of Rod’s, he decided to introduce his native cuisine: Korean food.

Photo by Julie Mirliss

Rod’s has been ranked multiple times by the Michigan Daily as the Best Korean food in Ann Arbor, specifically for having the best Bibimbap in A2, Rod’s most popular dish. Based off those accolades, Park’s nailed his goal of introducing American students to Korean food.

Yet, that really depends on your definition of Korean food. Park has himself admitted that the food he’s serving isn’t very authentic. Though the dishes may seem exotic, Park has altered his food to please the palates of American students. When I asked Park what his favorite dish was on the menu, he confessed he doesn’t eat any of it, pronouncing it too boring. He explained, ”American people don’t like the smell of true Korean food!”

Alas, to my dismay, there’s no crazy origin story behind this unlikely pairing of Korean food and frozen yogurt. Simply enough, Park wanted the students of Ann Arbor to appreciate Korean food, even if it’s a bit watered down. Given the awards and endless Rod’s devotees, it’s safe to say Park has accomplished his mission.

If you’ve never had a Bibimbap followed by a Collider from Rods, add it to that long “must try” list that any true Ann Arbor foodie holds near and dear to their heart.

It’s literally impossible to say no to a good Collider. Trust me, I’ve tried. Photo by Julie Mirliss

Insider Scoop: Michigan QB Devin Gardner comes in at least every other day for a Collider: vanilla yogurt, strawberries, bananas and cookie dough. Yes, I did try it and yes, you need to as well. However, my personal go-to Collider will forever be vanilla with Reese’s, chocolate sprinkles and cookie dough. Yum.

Seriously, how can you not trust that face? Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

The post The Story Behind Rod’s Diner appeared first on Spoon University.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.


Pitmaster Rodney Scott on the Most Important Part of Any Backyard BBQ (Nope, It’s Not the Food.)

Photo: Angie Mosier

Charleston locals lucky enough to ride by the original location of Rodney Scott’s BBQ on any given morning can smell whole hogs being slowly cooked in the smokehouse just as the sun is rising. The aroma is a part of Scott’s signature approach — each pig cooks for twelve or more hours, right on-site and over real wood. The schedule requires pulling cooked pork off the smokers throughout the day so each customer, from lunch to dinner, is tasting fresh barbecue.

Scott’s whole hog barbecue is legendary. All remaining photos: Jerrelle Guy

Scott’s restaurant is so beloved that he has two more locations — one in Birmingham, Alabama and another soon to come in Atlanta, Georgia — and has made appearances on Chef’s Table and Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. Plus, Scott himself won a James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast in 2018. His newest venture? Putting all of that knowledge into his first cookbook, Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Recipes & Perspectives from the Legendary Pitmaster.

Get Rodney’s cookbook here.

Scott, who cooked his first whole hog at age 11 as part of his family smokehouse in Hemmingway, South Carolina, knows how to cook a pig in his sleep. But writing a cookbook? That was another story. “It’s a whole new learning curve,” said Scott. For example, at the restaurant he makes his famous pepper-flecked vinegar-based Rod Sauce in 18 gallon batches — the home cook requires smaller yields, simpler directions, and flawless recipes that won’t require multiple trips to the grocery store.

Though the cookbook captures many of Scott’s signature recipes (including his whole hog roasting method, adapted for backyards with a DIY pit approach using cinder blocks, a steel drum, and some chicken wire) there’s one thing it can’t capture, and that is the hospitality and warmth that guests feel after entering one of Scott’s spots.

“Hospitality is the first flavor that goes into your meal or your event, so of course you want to make it good,” says Scott. “I believe you have to give people an experience as well as a tasteful dish.”

Back in Hemmingway, South Carolina a classmate once told Scott “You know, your food isn’t all that, but your personality makes it great,” recalls Scott. And, though his James Beard award tells another story about the food, this classmate was right about Scott’s personality: His positivity and warmth make his restaurants stand out in a region already awash in BBQ. So, we asked this legendary host for some of his tips for throwing your own memorable barbecue at home.

Go Big With the Invite

The aroma of fresh barbecue is the best kind of invitation.

Here’s the thing about a whole hog barbecue — your neighbors are going to smell it. And, if the party is good, they’re going to hear it, too. So don’t wait for complaints: “Stick an invite on the door of everyone within listening distance that you can afford to feed!” advises Scott. That’s the thing about whole hog barbecue — there’s plenty enough for a crowd. “The key is, you want them to be with you instead of interrupted by you.”

Have A “Disco Ball” Moment

One thing people might not notice at first glance is the disco ball hung up inside Rodney Scott’s BBQ. “I saw a disco ball for the first time at a nightclub in 1985 and I was just mesmerized,” says Scott. “Now I put one in all my restaurants. It’s a little thing, but it creates a moment, it indicates that you are stepping into a different place for a little bit.”

Whether that’s an over-the-top table setting, a colorful floral arrangement, or even a showstopping appetizer, discover your version of Scott’s disco ball. “You can bring that same energy in your own backyard with or without the disco ball,” says Scott. “But they do make portable disco balls…”

Be Your Own Front-of-House

Rodney’s smoked, then fried, wings are the ultimate crowd pleaser.

When Scott first started out he preferred to spend his time up all night shoveling hot coals under slow-roasting pork. But as he gained notoriety after an article in The New York Times, Scott realized people came not just for the food, but to see him as well. He needed to be spending more time up front, talking to customers and welcoming guests.

Take this same approach when hosting a BBQ: Have the cocktails batched, the plates and forks set out to grab, the sides ready to serve room temperature — after all, people are here not just to fill their bellies but to enjoy the company, too. You’ll know you are being a good host when you can greet each guest and let them know where the bathroom is and when the food will be ready, says Scott.

Tell a Story With Your Food

Not everything has to look effortless to your guests. Instead of adopting an “oh, I just whipped this up…” attitude, tell your friends exactly what went into the dishes you’ve prepared and why you chose them, says Scott. “Take the cookbook out, tell a story, try something new and ask them what they think,” he encourages. “That starts a conversion and it helps people open their eyes to the fact that there are different ways of doing food.”

Hoppin’ John is a southern specialty with a long tradition.

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie Copyright © 2021 by Rodney Scott’s BBQ, LLC, a South Carolina limited liability company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Jerrelle Guy. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.



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